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National News
  • Life and death at the heart of Boston bombing trial

    Courtroom sketch shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tsarnaev during the jury selection process in his trial at the federal courthouse in BostonBy Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - From the moment U.S. prosecutors stand up on Wednesday and begin their case against accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, their minds and those of their defense counterparts will be focused on just one thing: The death penalty. Tsarnaev, 21, is accused of killing three people and injuring 264 with a pair of homemade pressure-cooker bombs left at the race's crowded finish line on April 15, 2013, in the largest mass-casualty attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001. "The bottom line is you're not going to get a not guilty in this case," said Jules Epstein, a Widener University School of Law professor who has represented defendants in federal and Pennsylvania death penalty cases. So every move is with an eye on the end game and that is avoiding death." Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to all charges and his attorneys have offered little detail on their case, with the bulk of both prosecution and defense filings under seal in Boston federal court.


  • Homeland Security funding drama darkens U.S. fiscal outlook

    In this Feb. 27, 2015, photo, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., accompanied by House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer of Md., voice their objections to the Republican majority during a delay in voting for a short-term spending bill for the Homeland Security Department during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats didn?t get all they wanted in Congress? struggle over Homeland Security, but many feel they are winning a broader political war that will haunt Republicans in 2016 and beyond. "It?s a staggering failure of leadership that will prolong this manufactured crisis of theirs and endanger the security of the American people," said Pelosi. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)By Richard Cowan and David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Congress narrowly averted a partial shutdown of the U.S. domestic security agency late on Friday night, but the forces behind the chaotic episode remain - fractious Republicans and House Speaker John Boehner's lack of control over them. In five to seven months, the federal debt ceiling will again be reached, and by October Congress must pass spending bills to keep the government running in the new fiscal year. Failing to deal effectively with these issues could have much more damaging repercussions - such as a broad government shutdown or a debt default - than a partial shutdown of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Some conservatives speak of ousting Boehner, but it is unlikely they can muster enough votes, while others made clear on Friday that they were willing to take big risks to score ideological points.     Brinkmanship like this, reminiscent of 2013's 16-day federal government shutdown, was supposed to be over.


  • Funeral set for four Missouri shooting victims as probe continues
    By Kevin Murphy KANSAS CITY, Mo. (Reuters) - Funeral services for four of seven people slain last week in a small town in Missouri are scheduled for Thursday as authorities seek a motive in the killings. The four are members of a family killed in the shootings on Thursday in Tyrone, Missouri. Their funeral will take place at the First General Baptist Church in Willow Springs, Missouri, according to the Elliott-Gentry-Carder Funeral Home.
  • Newspaper: Nurse who survived Ebola says hospital failed her
    DALLAS (AP) ? A 26-year-old nurse said in a newspaper interview that a hospital where she had worked in Dallas and its parent company failed her when she contracted Ebola while caring for the first person in the U.S. diagnosed with the deadly disease.
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